Motor Skills


​​This area of learning includes big ideas about fine and gross motor skills.  

  • Fine motor skills require small-muscle strength and control such as copying letters and numbers, using eating utensils, putting together puzzles, manipulating blocks, cutting on straight lines, and closing fasteners such as snaps, buttons, and zippers.  
  • Gross motor skills required coordinated movements to complete more complex tasks such as the ability to hop, skip, jump, gallop, catch or throw a ball, or cross the mid-line.

For activities to help you support your child at home, please contact your child's teacher.

Big Idea 

The student demonstrates age-appropriate fine and gross motor skills.



Beginning
​Developing
​Demonstrating
​The student rarely demonstrates fine motor development that is expected of a typically developing kindergarten student.

She often is unable to perform tasks such as:
• copying letters and numbers,
• putting together simple puzzles,
• manipulating blocks,
• cutting on straight lines,
• using eating utensils, and
• closing fasteners such as snaps, buttons, and zippers, even with adult support.

She may demonstrate frustration when asked to complete tasks involving fine motor skills
​The student sometimes demonstrates fine motor development that is expected of a typically developing kindergarten student.

He is sometimes able to perform tasks such as:
• copying letters and numbers,
• putting together simple puzzles,
• manipulating blocks,
• cutting on straight lines,
• using eating utensils, and
• closing fasteners such as snaps, buttons, and zippers, with increased independence and complexity.

He rarely demonstrates frustration when asked to complete tasks involving fine motor skills.
The student demonstrates fine motor development that is expected of a typically developing kindergarten student.

She is able to independently perform tasks such as:
• copying letters, numbers and words,
• putting together puzzles,
• manipulating blocks,
• cutting on straight lines,
• using eating utensils, and
• closing fasteners such as snaps, buttons, and zippers, with independence and complexity.

She does not demonstrate frustration when asked to complete tasks involving fine motor skills.



Beginning
​Developing
​Demonstrating
​The student rarely demonstrates gross motor development that is expected of a typically developing kindergarten student.

He is unable to:
• hop, skip, jump, gallop,
• catch or throw a ball, or
• cross the mid-line.

He may demonstrate frustration when asked to complete tasks involving gross motor skills
​The student sometimes demonstrates gross motor development that is expected of a typically developing kindergarten student.

She is sometimes able to:
• hop, skip, jump, gallop,
• catch or throw a ball, or
• cross the mid-line with increased independence and complexity.

She sometimes demonstrates frustration when asked to complete tasks involving gross motor skills.
The student demonstrates gross motor development that is expected of a typically developing kindergarten student.

He is able to:
• hop, skip, jump, gallop,
• catch or throw a ball, or
• cross the mid-line with independence and complexity.

He rarely demonstrates frustration when asked to complete tasks involving gross motor skills.